The Nobel Prize in Physiology

Today, the Nobel Prize in Physiology was jointly awarded to James P. Allison and Tasuku Honjo for their discovery of cancer therapy by inhibition of negative immune regulation. Immune checkpoints are proteins on cells that keep the cells healthy and protect from attack. On normal cells, they serve an important purpose. However, with cancer cells they also protect them from attack. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are useful when they can target cancer cell immune checkpoints and allow cancer therapies to work to destroy the cancer cells. Programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), on the other hand, is a checkpoint protein that regulates immune response and prevents cells from harming important cells, such as those important in immune response. Consequently, PD-1 can also protect cancer cells. In this case, inhibitors of PD-1 can allow scientists to target cancer cells.1

 

Read more about their work and the Nobel Prize here: https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/medicine/2018/press-release/

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/01/health/nobel-prize-medicine.html

Here are some interesting articles about immune checkpoint inhibitors:

Here are related products carried by Peptides International (with more coming soon):

OVA Peptide (323-339)
POV-3636-PI

T-cell Activating Peptide/Immune checkpoint peptide

Programmed Cell Death 1 Human Recombinant
PRO-2442

Additional products can be found here.

Reference:

 

  1. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK481851/
Industry News , Recombinant Proteins , Peptides International News , Cancer

Denise Karounos

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Denise Karounos joined Peptides International in October 2016. After completing her BS in chemistry from West Virginia University, she spent time as an organic chemist at Bachem Bioscience synthesizing peptides and amino acid derivatives. Denise has experience with both solid and solution-phase peptide synthesis, and has worked under both research and cGMP settings. After completing her MBA from Saint Joseph’s University, Denise transitioned into product management of peptides and amino acid derivatives. In her marketing role, she had many duties including but not limited to product management, market research, creating and producing marketing materials, handling US catalog distribution and customer database, email marketing, quoting and inside sales, sales calls, and coordinating and attending trade conferences. 

At PI, Denise's duties encompass both sales and marketing, bringing to bear her extensive lab and sales support experience. Contact her today and see how Denise can assist you with your peptide research project.